Posts Written OnNovember 2013

What We Drank (November 12, 2013)

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  Here is a sampling of what libations passed the lips of our editors and contributors last week: Evan Dawson, Managing Editor: Mocali 2009 Rosso di Montalcino I suspect that, 20 years ago, wine writing was more focused on sifting through the flawed wines to find the good wines. Today, there aren’t many flawed wines on the market. Most are sound, safe, if banal. So when friends or family ask, “What wine should I drink with X?”, it’s hard to answer the question. They’re safe, generally speaking, in most categories. And yet, oddly, I find Rosso di Montalcino to be the…

New Proposal Could Allow Wine to be Shipped Through U.S. Mail

It’s not easy to earn unanimous approval of a major policy change in the wine industry, but the issue of alcohol mail restrictions seems to have achieved exactly that. Senator Chuck Schumer is proposing to end the ban that prevents the United States Postal Service from shipping wine, beer, and spirits. After speaking to dozens of industry professionals, the New York Cork Report has yet to find one who disagrees with the proposal. “It would be huge for our industry,” said Scott Osborn, owner of Fox Run Vineyards. “Having the postal service as another provider for our shipping will hopefully…

5 Questions with… Dan Mitchell, Fox Run Vineyards

Dan Mitchell, Regional Sales Manager, Fox Run Vineyards

This week, the New York Cork Report spoke with Dan Mitchell, Keuka Lake native and Regional Sales Manager at Fox Run Vineyards as part of our “5 Questions with…” feature series. Dan has spent the last 9 years with Fox Run Vineyards, four as tasting room manager which then evolved into his current role as regional sales manager.  He now is a wine-fueled road warrior logging over 30,000 miles on his car each year.  Although his territory is primarily New England he has recently found himself as far away as Western Canada promoting Fox Run and the Finger Lakes. What was…

Wine Should Be Expensive. Seriously.

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Wine should be expensive — and by “expensive” I mean it should pay for its own existence. Wine, as you well know, takes a long time to grow, a long time to make, a long time to brand, and a long time to sell. When overly-powerful retail-market forces press suppliers to roll back price points that natural competition drives off the last scant profits that may exist for that producer. When distributors mandate ever-increasing contributions to marketing from the producer, usually in the form of actual cash discounts, or dedicated sales representatives, there is very little left for the producer…

What We Drank (November 5, 2013)

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It’s rare that What We Drank — our weekly peek into what our editors and contributors are drinking — doesn’t include at least one New York wine, but it happened this week. looking at the diverse lineup though, it’s hard to argue with what found its way into the team’s glasses this week. Except maybe the box wine. I kid. Sorta. Lenn Thompson, Executive Editor: Louis Roederer “Brut Premier” Champagne I could have picked from a wide array of delicious drinks that crossed my lips last week — including Michael’s contribution below, which really was a stunner. My lovely wife, Nena,…

Channing Daughters Winery 2012 Ribolla Gialla

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Orange wine — that is white wines made in the style of red wines with extended skin contact — isn’t for everyone. Me, I find them fascinating and like them, though I’ll admit that my affection for them sometimes resides in my head instead of my heart. Intellectual stimulation over visceral enjoyment. Teasing apart the layers of flavor and texture that define James Christopher Tracy’s lineup of orange wines at Channing Daughters Winery is a fun parlor game among wine geeks — but I’ve poured them for non-geeks and the reaction is typically mixed. My wife doesn’t like them at…

Searching for — and Finding — Distinctiveness in Finger Lakes Pinot Noir

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Producing pinot noir is the wine industry’s equivalent to a high-wire act. When done right, it can be spectacular and breathtaking. But it requires courage and commitment, and leaves little margin for error. Pinot noir is a thin-skinned grape that requires a cool climate with moderate temperatures to be successfully cultivated. Excessive heat can rob the fruit of flavor and acidity. While it is fairly adaptable to different soil types (provided that the soil drains well), it also requires a certain amount of precipitation and long hang time for the variety’s characteristic aromas and complex flavors to develop. Despite conventional…