Browsing CategoryLong Island

HarvestMacari

My latest column for northfoker was published yesterday — “Uncork the Forks: 5 Under-Appreciated Long Island Grape Varieties.” It’s a quick piece about five grapes that deserve more attention (for one reason or another) in the local wine community. Some are obvious. Others might seem out of place in such a list. But read it and tell me what you think.

barry-family-2014-pastiche

When veteran Finger Lakes winemaker Ian Barry started Barry Family Cellars with his family back in 2011, he planned to focus on a core portfolio of riesling, chardonnay, pinot noir and cabernet franc, while also affording himself the ability tinker and experiment here and there with other grapes and techniques along the way. If any of the wines that resulted from those trials stood out, maybe he’d add to that core group of wines. If my last name were Barry, I’d be pushing for Barry Family Cellars 2014 Pastiche ($22) to join the permanent lineup. It’s one of the best non-riesling Finger Lakes white wines…

HarbesVineyard-2013steelchardonnay

Stainless steel-born chardonnay is rarely a revelation, but Harbes Vineyard 2013 Steel Fermented Chardonnay ($19) is classic North Fork steel chardonnay in all of its easy-drinking, fruit-forward glory. The aromas, begin with straightforward pear and yellow apple notes, but there’s also a faint citrus blossom-herb quality that add just a bit of nuance. Fruity on the medium-bodied, slightly glycerin  palate, sweet apples and pears are are backed by some lemon and lime flavors. There is a bit of weight here, but also fresh acidity for balance. The finish isn’t long, but it’s not abrupt either. Producer: Harbes Vineyard AVA: North Fork of Long Island ABV:…

roanoke-bottles

Enjoy visiting the Roanoke Vineyards tasting room on Sound Avenue, but aren’t a member of their rabidly loyal wine club? You’d better enjoy it for the rest of 2015 — or join the club — because as of January 1, 2016, the winery’s original tasting room is closing to the public. Only wine club members will be able to go there. Roanoke is the first Long Island winery to make such a move — a move that flies in the face of the region’s new focus on agri-tourism and ‘good enough’ wine. From the press release: “With a tsunami in tourism…

palmer-2014-merlot-rose

The rose reviews continue today with this 100% merlot bottling made by Miguel Martin at Palmer Vineyards. For an all-merlot rose, this one has some character. The red berries you’d expect are there — red cherries and cranberries — but also a bit of red apple and lightly floral overtones. The palate shows nice weight and texture, with bright berry flavor and citrusy acidity. Merlot rose rarely thrills, but this one is satisfying and delicious. Just don’t expect a ton of complexity. Producer: Palmer Vineyards AVA: North Fork of Long Island Price: $20 (sample) (3 out of 5, Very good/Recommended)

southold-farm-cellar-2014-minor-threat-cabernet-franc

Dry rose has never been more popular, but Southold Farm + Cellar co-owner and winemaker Regan Meador hasn’t made one in his label’s two vintages to date — but not because he has anything against the now-trendy style. “I’ve never made one before, for one,” he said when I asked him why he hasn’t made one yet, adding ” But, I wanted to explore a different side of cab franc. There’s a lot of good examples of rose cabernet franc, but I would rather see where else the variety could go.” Enter Southold Farm + Cellar “Minor Threat” Cabernet Franc…

mccall-2014-rose

For several vintages now, McCall Wines’ rose has been a favorite in the Thompson household. It was also made with pinot noir. With the 2013 vintage, McCall added a second rose, adding a merlot-based wine to the lineup. In 2014, the winery’s entire rose production was merlot (I with a small addition of sauvignon blanc). “The pinot noir was a saignee. We wanted greater concentration in our red pinot noir without over-handling the wine. 2014 was such a stellar vintage that we didn’t need to do saignee. We would rather make the full amount of good-vintage pinot noir,” said Brewster McCall.…

IMG_4128

I consider this wine a rose, though winemaker Anthony Nappa often refuses to call it one when we talk, preferring to call it a white pinot noir. Some years it’s whiter than others, but I consider it a rose regardless of color because of how it drinks — like a rose. Anthony Nappa Wines 2014 Anomaly ($20) is made with pinot noir grown both in the Finger Lakes and on Long Island because Nappa thinks that “a combination of New York’s two most prominent winegrowing regions complements each other and brings nice balance to this wine.” Unlike so many marketing messages in the wine world, I…

harb001 - 2013 Malbec Front Label-OPTION 2

I’ve been tasting a lot of Long Island rose over the past few weeks — both because it’s the season and because I was researching a story that will be published in the Long Island Wine Press next month. Like any category, Long Island rose is always a mixed bag. There are wines that you know will always be good, regardless of vintage. There are wines you always want to be good, but underwhelm. And then there are the wines that surprise you — either in a good or bad way. Harbes Vineyard 2014 Dry Rose ($18) was a pleasant surprise…

wolffer-2014-summer-in-a-bottle-rose

Much like the season that inspired its name, Wolffer Estate Vineyard‘s “Summer in a Bottle” Rose has been hot since its debut last spring. The initial 1,500 or so cases were gone seemingly before summer had hit its stride. Winemaker Roman Roth made nearly four times as much in 2014 (5,700 cases) so it should be around at least a bit longer into the season, which is a very good thing. Wolffer Estate Vineyards 2014 “Summer in a Bottle” Rose ($24) shows aromas of strawberries and mixed melons — orange and green. It’s not as brightly aromatic as its sister rose, but it’s not muted either.…