Posts Tagged“chardonnay”

WTN: Lenz 2005 “Old Vines” Chardonnay (North Fork of Long Island)

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Yesterday I wrote about a $20 chardonnay that I just wasn’t into from Lenz Winery. Today, I’m going to tell you about another chardonnay that they just released that shows much more balance, elegance and overall quality. And, it’s only $5 more. Yes, I think you’ll do well to upgrade to the Lenz 2005 “Old Vines” Chardonnay ($25), one of Long Island’s better values in barrel-fermented chardonnay. It’s debatable whether or not any vines on Long Island qualify as old — I think these vines are still less than 30 years old — but that’s a discussion for a different…

WTN: Lenz 2005 Gold Label Chardonnay (North Fork of Long Island)

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I’ll tell you about my favorite of the Lenz Winery chardonnays tomorrow, but today let’s focus on one that I didn’t like as much. Actually, I’ve never cared for winemaker Eric Fry’s Gold Label Chardonnay much, and his 2005 release ($20) is no different. It’s definitely made in the California style that is – thankfully – losing popularity among most wine drinkers. It’s medium-dark gold in the glass with a lot of oak on the nose, coming across with toasted marshmallow, sweet oak, and faint caramel aromas. There’s also some roasted apple there, but it’s subservient to the domineering oak.…

WTN: Macari Vineyards 2007 Early Wine (North Fork of Long Island)

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Just about every Long Island winemaker and vineyard manager I’ve spoken to in recent weeks has told me that 2007 is going to be a tremendous, classic vintage for Long Island wines. Sure, sometimes winemakers are prone to hyperbole – they do need to sell wine after all – but I trust them this time. We’ve had months of sunny, warm-but-not-hot days with very little rain. Of course, we won’t know for at least several months just how good the white wines of 2007 will be. For the reds, it could be several years. But if you don’t want to…

WTN: Wolffer Estate 2004 Cabernet Franc (The Hamptons, Long Island)

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Wolffer Estate, one of two quality-focused producers in the Hamptons, focuses mainly on two varieties: Merlot and Chardonnay. They make no fewer than four different bottlings of each — including Long Island’s most expensive wine the Premier Cru Merlot, which retails for $125 and a succulent, lively late harvest chardonnay. Some of those wines are good for everyday drinking. Some are stunningly delicious and complex. But still, who can live on only merlot and chardonnay? I know that I can’t and, as you probably know, I’m a big fan of Long Island cabernet franc. Wolffer’s winemaker, Roman Roth, makes a…

WTNs: Pellegrini Vineyards’ New and Upcoming Releases (North Fork of Long Island)

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I tell anyone who will listen that they should try new wines whenever possible. That’s how we learn about new regions, grapes and winemakers. It’s how we expand our wine knowledge and grow as wine drinkers. But, that doesn’t mean that we can’t — and shouldn’t — come back to long-time favorites as well. Pellegrini Vineyards — and its Vinter’s Pride Encore — are just the kind of favorites worth coming back to. It was one of the first red blends I tasted on Long Island and remains one that I enjoy every time I taste it, regardless of vintage.…

WTN: Raphael 2006 Grand Cru Chardonnay (North Fork of Long Island)

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One of the greatest things about Long Island wines is their food-friendliness. Many are fruit-forward, but they almost never plunge into the overtly fruity, high-alcohol pool of many other New World wines. Alcohol levels usually hover around the 12-13% level as well, meaning you can have two or three glasses of wine with dinner and not need a nap. Cool nights and ocean breezes help growing grapes retain their natural acidity as well–another great benefit for those who like wine with food. A move away from heavy new oak–or at least more judicious use of said oak–also results in wines…

Wine Blogging Wednesday #36: Let’s Get Naked

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Now that I have your attention, let’s get down to business. Next month, on August 8 to be exact, we’ll be celebrating the three-year anniversary of Wine Blogging Wednesday. Actually, in the early days, it was called World Wide Wine Blogging Wednesday. But, participants quickly streamlined the name and the rest is Internet history. What started out as a few hardcore wine blogging geeks has really grown into more than I could have imagined. For that, I am grateful. Thank you to every person who has ever participated. But let’s stop looking back…let’s look forward. The theme for WBW #36…

Wolffer Has a Way with Chardonnay

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Chardonnay. It’s a grape that makes many wine lovers shudder. I blame the over-oaked, buttery, flabby chardonnays coming out of California. The overly tropical ones coming from Down Under aren’t doing us any favors either. I’m talking about barrel fermented chardonnay here, by the way. Gary over at Wine Library TV complains about these wines and the "Oak Monster." And he’s right. There was even a time when I turned my nose up at barrel-fermented chardonnay because so few winemakers seemed to know how to use oak judiciously–as a spice rather than main component. Local wineries fell into this trap…

WTN: Osprey’s Dominion Vineyards 2005

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Adam Suprenant, winemaker at Osprey’s Dominion Vineyards is a busy man. While many Long Island wineries crank out only four, eight, maybe even 12 different wines each year, Suprenant makes no fewer than two dozen. These wines range in style from sweet, entry-level wines made with peaches and strawberries all the way up to a stellar Meritage-style red blends, which he calls "Flight." Such a diverse portfolio creates an interesting situation in the tasting room and a visit there can be a hit-or-miss proposition. On several occasions, I’ve found myself elbow to elbow with college-age kids treating the tasting room…