Posts Tagged“malbec”

Corks of the Forks: A Look at the “Other” Local Grapes

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A couple months ago, I devoted my column space to what has become the de facto “signature variety” for Long Island wine country: merlot. There are approximately 700 acres of merlot planted on Long Island — roughly 30 percent of the total vineyard acreage — and there are reasons for that. It grows and ripens dependably and consistently, even in all but the most horrid of vintages. That’s important here and why it’s the backbone of the industry.  But the East End isn’t like many parts of Europe where regulations dictate what grapes can be grown where. Long Island growers…

Lenz Winery 2010 Malbec

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Lenz Winery 2010 Malbec ($35) — the winery’s first-ever varietal malbec release — opens with a beautiful nose of ripe plum, blueberry and currant with notes of black licorice, tar and lilac. Juicy and fruity on the palate with almost no oak footprint, the fruit edges on over-ripe with dried plum and fig notes joining the dark fruits apparent on the nose. Licorice pokes its head in on the mid-palate. The tannins are lightly grippy, but it’s acidity that provides most of the structure. Medium-long black cherry-meets-fig finish.   Producer: The Lenz Winery AVA: North Fork of Long Island ABV: 13%…

What We Drank (July 24, 2013 Edition)

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Todd Trzaskos: Alamos 2011 Malbec Yes, it’s a “big brand” wine. Yes, drinking Malbec is trendy. Yes, it’s inexpensive, and not a “special” wine. And Yes, it is good. I’m willing to bet that quite a few folks recognize this wine, and may have enjoyed it themselves on occasion. It was one of those evenings where we needed something tasty but not challenging, would be pleasant with leftovers, and would help pull down the average on the weekly wine budget. It met these needs admirably, with a quality that is above average. Ripe, lush, plum fruit, good freshness, and not…

WTN: Macari Vineyards 2005 Malbec (North Fork)

You’ve heard all about Long Island merlot, but what about the Malbec? Merlot might rule this over-grown sand bar, but Malbec, the large, easy-to-ripen black grape best known as Argentina’s premier variety, is showing surprising potential in Long Island’s maritime environment. It has been grown, and used, on Long Island for quite some time—usually ending up as a minor component in Bordeaux-style red blends. But now, as Long Island vintners continue to experiment with grapes and techniques, varietal Malbec bottlings are becoming available. Macari Vineyards in Mattituck released its 2005 Malbec ($22) a couple months ago and it’s impressive. It’s…

WTN: Raphael 2004 Malbec (North Fork of Long Island)

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Don’t cry for me Argentina Long Island? Yes, there is malbec growing on Long Island — and probably more than you realize. Once a major component in the wines of Bordeaux, this large, fairly easy-to-ripen black grape is now best known in Argentina, where it is most often bottled alone, and as a bit player (along with cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, merlot and petit verdot) in in Meritage and other blended red wines in U.S., Australia and South Africa. So it only makes sense many of Long Island’s meritage-style reds feature small amounts of malbec — typicaly from 1 –…