Posts Tagged“merlot”

Clovis Point (Jamesport, NY): Current Releases

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Last week I wrote about Clovis Point, one of the North Fork’s newest wine labels, but I didn’t say much about the wines themselves. And many of you didn’t like that too much. I must have gotten at least ten emails saying "what about the wines, Lenn?" So, here’s a brief rundown of the wines Clovis Point currently has available on their website: Clovis Point’s 2004 Chardonnay ($13.50). This wine was fermented mostly in stainless steel with just a little barrel-fermented chardonnay and Gewürztraminer added. With bright fruit, super-subtle barrel notes and nice balance at this price point, this was…

2003 Releases from Sherwood House Vineyards

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2003 wasn’t a great vintage for Long Island wines — and many of the wines I’ve tasted from the vintage support that statement. Many, particularly the reds, tend to be under ripe and lacking flavor. The whole growing season wasn’t sub-par, but one of the most important parts was. After a perfectly fine spring and summer, untimely rain and then two October frosts did the vintage in. Basically, frost kills the vines’ canopy, stopping photosynthesis and keeping the grapes from getting fully ripe. You can talk about “hang time” (on the vine) all you want, but without the sugar factory,…

Tasting Vintage Variation — A Flight of “Flight”

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You can buy bottle after bottle of mass-produced, ubiquitous wines like Yellowtail Shiraz or Cavit Pinot Grigio without even looking at the year on the label. That’s because year-to-year variation is barely perceptible in those wines. Huge vineyards, huge production and blending options that lead to a “house style” all result in fairly consistent flavors year in and year out. That’s boring and lame if you ask me. That sort of cookie-cutter consistency is not the case here on Long Island, where even the largest vineyards are miniscule by world standards. And, with generally cool weather that changes considerably from…

This Week On Appellation America (9/29/06)

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I don’t often write much about my Appellation America gig here on LENNDEVOURS. But, for those of you that don’t know, I’m the regional correspondant for both the Long Island and Hudson Valley regions. What this means is that in addition to helping build appellation consciousness for the two regions, I’m responsble for tasting and recommending their wines as well. It’s hard work, but somebody has to do it, right? The cool thing is that editorial really drives the Appellation America site — a rarity in the wine media world to be sure. Starting today, I’ll highlight my Appellation America…

Lenz Merlot Classic, Roanoke 2004 Preview BBQ and Upcoming Events

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Fall is one of the most exciting — and hectic — times on the East End of Long Island. The grapes have undergone veraison — the green grapes have changed color and started to ripen — and harvest season has begun (for sparkling wine) and will continue well into November. The ever-popular pumpkins and mums are also coming in, so the crowds will be flooding their favorite farm stands and nurseries. They bring a lot of energy to the region — but they make it harder for me to get to the wineries because of the traffic. As with any…

The First Batch of North Fork Red Wine Vinegar

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My first batch of AVA-designated red wine vinegar has been siphoned off and bottled. I haven’t actually used it in any cooking yet, but I can tell you this — the flavor is so much more intense than anything you’ll buy at any supermarket or even specialty shop. For my next batch, which will be ready in time for holiday gift giving, I’m going to use only merlot from the North Fork of Long Island AVA. I know that I’ve been a bit lax posting lately, but that’s only because real work has gotten in the way. Stay tuned for…

Winners From the New York Wine and Food Classic

This week, Hermann J. Wiemer Vineyard’s 2005 Dry Riesling ($16) defeated 702 other New York wines to win the Governor’s Cup, awarded to the events best wine. Dr. Konstantin Frank’s Vinifera Wine Cellars was named New York’s "Winery of the Year" based on the number, and level, of medals its wines won. Sponsored and run by the New York Wine and Grape Foundation (NYWGF), a nonprofit statewide trade organization based in the in newly opened New York Wine and Culinary Center. Howard Goldberg reported in the New York Times, "The wine industry and influential wine periodicals treat the contest as…

WTN: Wolffer Estate Vineyards 2002 Estate Selection Merlot (The Hamptons, Long Island)

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I’ve written about the wines of Wolffer Estate several times, so I probably don’t need to provide much background here. Just know that despite vineyards that have slightly more chardonnay in them than merlot, Wolffer, and winemaker Roman Roth are devoted to Long Island merlot. They are a founding member of the Long Island Merlot Alliance and also create Long Island’s most expensive merlot — their Premier Cru Merlot ($125). One can easily argue the merits of both a $125 bottle of Long Island wine and the LIMA, but today we’re talking about Wolffer Estate Vineyards’ 2002 Estate Selection Merlot…

WTN: Grapes of Roth 2001 Merlot ($50)

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Later this month, Roman Roth, the winemaking talent behind the wines of Wolffer Estate, Shinn Estate Vineyards and Roanoke Vineyards, will show off his garagiste side. Translated from French garagiste literally means “garage owner," but in the world of wine, it’s used to describe a winemaker who produces small lots of high-quality, handcrafted wines – sometimes right in his or her own garage. And while Roth didn’t make his private label — Grapes of Roth — in his garage, he’s embraced the garagiste philosophy, crafting fewer than two hundred cases of his 2001 Grapes of Roth Merlot ($50). Roth grew…

WTN: Shinn Estate Vineyards “Red” ($14)

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I have an announcement to make: I have a new favorite local red wine for every day, food-friendly drinking. Shinn Estate Vineyard’s non-vintage Red ($14) is a blend of 75% merlot and 25% cabernet sauvignon, isn’t the most complex local merlot. It isn’t the richest, deepest pour either…but it’s ideally suited for food Light-to-medium bodied, this wine actually has some pinot noir-like qualities despite the grapes involved. Light ruby in the glass, the nose is mainly raspberry and strawberries, with just the most subtle hints of spice. The palate is juicy red berries, hints of oak character, and terrific food-friendly…