Posts Tagged“north fork”

Long Island Mid-Harvest Report

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Last year’s grape harvest was remarkable both for the hot, dry conditions that lasted all summer long and the almost twenty inches of rain that was dumped on the East End over eight days right in the middle of harvest. White grapes were largely unaffected because they had already been picked, but many of the Island’s red grapes weren’t so lucky. That rain completely decimated some producers to the point where they didn’t make red wines last year at all. Others escaped mostly unscathed and have made some tremendous wines. There will be less 2005 red wine on shelves once…

Ternhaven Cellars Releases Rustic Reds

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Earlier this year, when Harold Watts sold his five-acre vineyard, fans of his Ternhaven Cellars wines worried that he’d close the doors to his Greenport tasting room too. Luckily for those fans — myself among them— reports of the North Fork’s easternmost tasting room’s demise were overstated. Watts, 73, has just released his 2001 wines and has vintages up to and including 2005 aging for future release in his tasting room. His wines are also available at The Tasting Room on Peconic Lane, Long Island’s only co-op tasting room for small, artisanal producers. On many occasions, I’ve described Watts, a…

This Week On Appellation America (9/29/06)

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I don’t often write much about my Appellation America gig here on LENNDEVOURS. But, for those of you that don’t know, I’m the regional correspondant for both the Long Island and Hudson Valley regions. What this means is that in addition to helping build appellation consciousness for the two regions, I’m responsble for tasting and recommending their wines as well. It’s hard work, but somebody has to do it, right? The cool thing is that editorial really drives the Appellation America site — a rarity in the wine media world to be sure. Starting today, I’ll highlight my Appellation America…

WTN: Raphael 2004 Malbec (North Fork of Long Island)

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Don’t cry for me Argentina Long Island? Yes, there is malbec growing on Long Island — and probably more than you realize. Once a major component in the wines of Bordeaux, this large, fairly easy-to-ripen black grape is now best known in Argentina, where it is most often bottled alone, and as a bit player (along with cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, merlot and petit verdot) in in Meritage and other blended red wines in U.S., Australia and South Africa. So it only makes sense many of Long Island’s meritage-style reds feature small amounts of malbec — typicaly from 1 –…

WTN: Corey Creek Vineyards 2005 Reserve Chardonnay (North Fork of Long Island)

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Corey Creek Vineyards, owned by New Line Cinema chairman Michael Lynne, produces mostly white wines (the reds are bottled under sister winery Bedell Cellars’ label), including one of Long Island’s best gewurztraminers, a flavorful late harvest riesling and two different styles of chardonnay. Too often, Long Island chardonnay is severely over oaked in an attempt to make the rich, buttery style that (unfortunately) remains so popular with consumers. These wines usually fail because, unlike warmer California regions, local fruit just doesn’t get as ripe and can’t stand up to heavy oak. Disappointingly few local producers balance fruit and oak well…

The First Batch of North Fork Red Wine Vinegar

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My first batch of AVA-designated red wine vinegar has been siphoned off and bottled. I haven’t actually used it in any cooking yet, but I can tell you this — the flavor is so much more intense than anything you’ll buy at any supermarket or even specialty shop. For my next batch, which will be ready in time for holiday gift giving, I’m going to use only merlot from the North Fork of Long Island AVA. I know that I’ve been a bit lax posting lately, but that’s only because real work has gotten in the way. Stay tuned for…

Appellation America Q&A: Kareem Massoud, Paumanok Vineyards

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It seems that almost every winery calls itself "family run" even if no one in the family ever touches a vine or steps foot in the winery itself. Paumanok Vineyards on the North Fork of Long Island, on the other hand, actually is run by the Massoud family. This month at Appellation America, my North Fork Q&A is with Kareem Massoud, Charles and Ursula Massoud’s eldest son. After attending business school and working for a private investment firm in Manhattan, the family vineyard called him back to the East End. Now, he’s making the wines alongside his father, Charles, making…

WTN: Lieb Family Cellars 2005 Pinot Blanc Reserve

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When it comes to pinot blanc, its resemblance to chardonnay isn’tlimited to finished wines. Pinot blanc’s leaf structure, clusters andberries so resemble chardonnay that there are many vineyards in Europewhere plantings of the two grapes are intermingled. Here on the North Fork, pinot blanc is grown in a few vineyards, butat Lieb Family Cellars, it’s an important, indespensible part of theirportfolio. In a field on Oregon Road in Cutchogue, you’ll find a 13acres of what Lieb Family Cellars, much like those Europeans, oncethought to be chardonnay vines. Genetic technology has since proventhat the grapes aren’t chardonnay at all. These vines,…

WTN: Jamesport Vineyards 2004 Sarah’s Hill Pinot Noir (North Fork of Long Island)

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There aren’t a ton of local producers making pinot noir here on Long Island. The "heartbreak" grape is difficult to grow anywhere, but with Long Island’s humidity, I think it’s even harder. I know of at least one winemaker that has stopped making pinot noir completely — using his pinot grapes strictly for bubbly now. That said, Jamesport Vineyards can usually be counted on for a solid bottling. Owner and vineyard manager Ron Goerler is one of the North Fork’s most respected growers and has long been known for growing quality fruit. This wine was fermented using indigenous yeast, and…

WTN: Shinn Estate Vineyards “Red” ($14)

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I have an announcement to make: I have a new favorite local red wine for every day, food-friendly drinking. Shinn Estate Vineyard’s non-vintage Red ($14) is a blend of 75% merlot and 25% cabernet sauvignon, isn’t the most complex local merlot. It isn’t the richest, deepest pour either…but it’s ideally suited for food Light-to-medium bodied, this wine actually has some pinot noir-like qualities despite the grapes involved. Light ruby in the glass, the nose is mainly raspberry and strawberries, with just the most subtle hints of spice. The palate is juicy red berries, hints of oak character, and terrific food-friendly…