Posts Tagged“pinot gris”

Barry Family Cellars 2014 “Pastiche” White Blend

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When veteran Finger Lakes winemaker Ian Barry started Barry Family Cellars with his family back in 2011, he planned to focus on a core portfolio of riesling, chardonnay, pinot noir and cabernet franc, while also affording himself the ability tinker and experiment here and there with other grapes and techniques along the way. If any of the wines that resulted from those trials stood out, maybe he’d add to that core group of wines. If my last name were Barry, I’d be pushing for Barry Family Cellars 2014 Pastiche ($22) to join the permanent lineup. It’s one of the best non-riesling Finger Lakes white wines…

Billsboro Winery 2012 Pinot Gris

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Billsboro Winery‘s 2012 Pinot Gris ($16) is an under-stated wine that shows delicate aromas of mandarin orange and pink grapefruit backed by lightly floral notes and and interesting blanched-almond quality that emerges as the wine warms. Light-bodied and with just a bit of residual sugar (1%) that shows on the mid-palate, it’s fresh and lightly fruity with apricot, grapefruit and citrus blossom flavors.  The finish shows a bit of pithy citrus that combines with vivacious acidity to help it finish dry and refreshing. Producer: Billsboro Winery AVA: Finger Lakes RS: 1% ABV: 11.5% TA: 9.4 g/L pH: 2.86 Production: 274 cases Price: $16* (3 out of…

The New York Cork Report Guide to Thanksgiving Wine

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Thanksgiving wine columns. Editors demand them. Writers write them. Of course, people read them. They must. These “Perfect Thanksgiving Wine” columns are ubiquitous. We don’t like them here, though. We don’t think anyone should worry so much about wine pairings of any sort, for any meal. Wine pairing is often much more about avoiding bad pairings than it is finding the singular “perfect” wine for whatever is on your plate. Barbera is getting a lot of attention this year in Thanksgiving columns. It’s a great pick — fruity, low-tannin and crunch with acidity. But is it t he “perfect Thanksgiving wine?…

Lenz Winery 2010 Pinot Gris

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Far from your neighbor’s cheap pinot grigio, Lenz Winery 2010 Pinot Gris ($25), shows off the ripeness of the 2010 growing season in its intensity. Apple and musk melon aromas are accented by notes of white flowers and a drizzle of honey. The dry, medium-bodied palate is fruity up front, showing sweet, concentrated apple and pear flavors again accented by honey and subtle spice. Gentle creaminess on the mid-palate is quickly sliced through by fresh, citrusy acidity that carries through on the medium-length finish. Producer: Lenz Winery AVA: North Fork of Long Island ABV: 12.5% Price: $25* (2.5 out of 5, Average-to-Very Good)  …

Red Newt Cellars 2007 Curry Creek Vineyards Pinot Gris

Most of the pinot gris coming out of the Finger Lakes (or Long Island for that matter) is mediocre at best, barely a step up from the lemon-water pinot grigio that you'll find at most every bar and restaurant. As with every wine generalization, there are exceptions of course. For instance, I almost always like Channing Daughters Winery's Pinot Grigio and now I can add a second wine to the "good New York pinot gris/grigio" list: Red Newt Cellars 2007 Curry Creek Vineyards 2007 Pinot Gris ($24) Right out of the fridge (when the wine was over-chilled) this wine wasn't…

Sheldrake Point 2007 Pinot Gris

Sheldrake Point Vineyard, located on the western short of Cayuga Lake in New York's Finger Lakes region, makes some terrific wines. Over the years I've particularly enjoyed their rieslings and even a couple cabernet francs here and there. This wine, the Sheldrake Point 2007 Pinot Gris ($12) was underwhelming. The pinot gris (or pinot grigio) grape should do well in the Finger Lakes, and I've had some bottles that were good, if not great. This one just fell a bit flat for me. In the glass, it's a pale straw color but the nose is surprisingly neutral with only a…