Posts Tagged“raphael”

WTN: Raphael 2006 Grand Cru Chardonnay (North Fork of Long Island)

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One of the greatest things about Long Island wines is their food-friendliness. Many are fruit-forward, but they almost never plunge into the overtly fruity, high-alcohol pool of many other New World wines. Alcohol levels usually hover around the 12-13% level as well, meaning you can have two or three glasses of wine with dinner and not need a nap. Cool nights and ocean breezes help growing grapes retain their natural acidity as well–another great benefit for those who like wine with food. A move away from heavy new oak–or at least more judicious use of said oak–also results in wines…

WTN: Raphael 2006 Sauvignon Blanc (North Fork of Long Island)

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As you know, lots of Long Island winemakers still focus on the parallels between their own region and Bordeaux. Merlot and the cabernets–sauvignon and franc–are clearly the dominant red grapes here and they do well (except maybe sauvignon, which only thrives in the best years in the best locations). But, market conditions being what they are, most white wine made in these parts is made with chardonnay, the white grape of Burgundy. Those wines can be simple and gulpable or rich, complex and truly Burgundian, but they are nothing like white Bordeaux, which are made with sauvignon blanc and semillon.…

Meet Mickey Mouse. Drink New York Wines.

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I just got an email telling me that Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort’s Blue Zoo restaurant will soon be pouring six, count em six, New York wines. So, now you can take your kids to meet Mickey and Minnie Mouse…and then enjoy some some delectable Finger Lakes and Long Island wines with dinner. The wines chosen by Blue Zoo’s team are: Atwater Estate Cabernet Franc Heron Hill Ingle Vineyard Riesling Heron Hill Semi-Dry Riesling Sheldrake Point Riesling (my review) Raphael La Fontana Wolffer Estate Selection Chardonnay I’ve had all of these wines with the exception of Atwater’s cab…

Holiday Wine Survival Tips

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Ah yes, the holiday season. It overflows with extra food, extra family time and – if we’re lucky – lots of extra drink to get us through that extra family time. Of course it also brings the ubiquitous holiday party as well – thrown by your neighbor, your friends, your boss or, again, your family. This time of year, it seems like everyone I know asks me for suggestions on what wines they should take to all of those parties. Maybe your friends try to serve you koolaid-like white zinfandel or cheap, way-too-simple-for-the-holidays Aussie shiraz with a furry creature on…

Donate and Win the “Big Reds of Long Island”

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In case you missed it, I’m participating in A Menu for Hope again this year. We’ve already raised over $10,000, so thanks to each and every one of you who have donated already. For those of you that haven’t, I’m going to highlight some of the Long Island wine-related lots that are available as raffle prizes. Today, I want to talk about the "Big Reds of Long Island" prize. If you win this three-pack of Long Island reds, you’ll get a bottle of Roanoke Vineyards 2003 Blend Two, which I’ve reviewed previously on this site, saying: "Cabernet franc (48%) dominates…

Author of Long Island’s AVAs @ Appellation America

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This week at Appellation America, you’ll find my Q&A with Richard Olsen-Harbich, winemaker and managing director for Raphael. Rich has been working in the local wine industry for almost 30 years. The interview focuses on three main topics: Long Island’s three AVAs (he authored them), the differences between the two forks, and the varieties (and styles) he thinks do best on Long Island. You may recognize Rich from his contributions here at LENNDEVOURS as well, including: Human Terroir and Parenting Wines The Urban Legend of Sulfites The War on Terroir and Wines of Mass Vinification Read my Q&A over at…

WTN: Raphael 2004 Malbec (North Fork of Long Island)

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Don’t cry for me Argentina Long Island? Yes, there is malbec growing on Long Island — and probably more than you realize. Once a major component in the wines of Bordeaux, this large, fairly easy-to-ripen black grape is now best known in Argentina, where it is most often bottled alone, and as a bit player (along with cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, merlot and petit verdot) in in Meritage and other blended red wines in U.S., Australia and South Africa. So it only makes sense many of Long Island’s meritage-style reds feature small amounts of malbec — typicaly from 1 –…