Posts Tagged“southampton publick house”

oktoberfest

I received this beer as a gift, unaware that Southampton Publick House even produced an Oktoberfest (Marzen) beer. Beers made in this style, and not just seasonally, are some of my favorite beers to drink.  The mild hopping, big maltiness, and slight sweetness of Oktoberfest beers work well in basically any situation that involves drinking beer. Southampton Publick House’s rendition this year is excellent and proper to the style. Although there may have been some spice/adjunct additions, the ale is a nice dull copper with hefty foam. The nose diffuses caramel malt, nutmeg, and an earthy quality of dry hay.  The texture of the beer is full and luscious. The milky texture carries a serious malt flavor reminiscent of unfermented beer wort. This makes sense as many brewers purposefully leave some residual sugars(derived from malt) in an Oktoberfest to balance out the big body and flavor of the beer. More roasty,…

southampton-publick-house

Irish Ales or “Irish Reds” are rarely brewed on Long Island — perhaps because we aren’t in Ireland. Nevertheless, the borrowed style seems to have been almost ignored once people realized they could order a Bourbon Barrel Bacon Doughnut beer. The style has waned in popularity here in the United States, with newer and bigger beers coming along and dominating. It reminds me a bit of Counting Crows’ popularity in the 90’s. “But I always liked Counting Crows” you might say. Well good, me too. I also like Irish Reds. So I’m bringing it back to a beer I have liked for years, and I even found one made ‘round here. The ale pours an amber-red with a brown core and a finger head that barely leaves a trace. The nose is warm and sweet, with ginger, nutmeg, allspice and brown sugar. There’s a strong starchy aroma that brought a vision of cooked…

bier-de-mars

The literal translation of the French phrase, “Biere De Mars,” is “Beer of March.” Traditionally, this farmhouse-style beer is made in early spring with the first harvest of grain, and then aged before release. The brewing of ale in colder months ensured that the fermentation would be more controlled, preventing unwanted flavors brought on by summer temperatures. Nowadays, brewing technology and climate control have removed the necessity of this seasonal brewing, but the style is still crafted by some small breweries. Luckily, for beer enthusiasts such as myself, Southampton Publick House still embraces many of these old world brewing techniques that are all but forgotten. Southampton Publick House uses a blend of wheat and barley malts in their Biere De Mars. The light amber beer is finished with an ample dose of continental hops and some added spices. The nose is distinctively yeasty, similar to a Saison, but with more hops present. It reminded me of freshly…

southampton-russian-imperial-stout

Russian Imperial Stouts, like India Pale Ales, are named after the region they were originally shipped to, rather than where they were brewed.  The flavors and alcohol content of these styles (that we have grown to love as consumers) were born out of necessity.  High alcohol and hop content act as natural preservatives in beer.  So, as demand for foreign beer grew internationally, brewers resorted to adding additional hops and fermenting to higher alcohol — ensuring that their product could be shipped across longer distances.  Made to last, IPAs and Russian Imperial Stouts are still some of the most cellar-worthy beers made today. Southampton Publick House brews a Imperial Russian Stout every year and it has attracted a cult-like following. Its relatively small production means high demand, and few bottles left for the cellar. My bottle “aged” about two weeks before I caved and popped it open — still in…

saranac-pumpkin

Pumpkin ale is the beaujolais nouveau of the beer world: it’s ubiquitous in the fall and it gets little respect. Beer drinkers complain that they show up too early, and sure, August is a bit early –– but this year August was pumpkin season. Then they complain that pumpkin ales just don’t taste good. Well, they don’t all taste the same, so that has to be a generalization, unless you hate the taste of pumpkin or pumpkin spices in which case shut your damn mouth. Then they complain that they’re everywhere, which wouldn’t be true if nobody drank them. I say –– no, I implore: stop the whining. Find a pumpkin ale you like, or move straight on to the winter beers and let us have our fun. Halloween weekend is the perfect time to indulge in a pumpkin ale (they’re surprisingly good with candy, given their sweetness). There are…

By Julia Burke, Beer Editor Long Island brewery Southampton Publick House has arrived in western New York and I can't think of a nicer way to ring in the holidays than with this consistently impressive brewery's lineup of interesting and varied styles. Double White pours a glowing sunrise-haze gold color and shows a brief one-finger head and beautiful bubbles. A clean, crisp nose with only a subtle whiff of cardamom and lemon and just a little bit of clementine give way as it opens to bready wheat character and citrusy Belgian yeast esters. The mouthfeel is excellent –smooth, bready, just a touch sweet, and perfectly carbonated. Balance all around, especially in the alcohol department (as a "double" it's 6.6%, spot on for the level of complexity and perfectly integrated) makes this a great food match.  I've been on a crazy Chinese cooking kick lately and the pairing with pork fried rice…

By Kevin Burns, Beer Columnist Our latest beer review comes from the Southampton Publick House on Long Island. Wheat beers are usually my favorite style for the summer, and Belgian wheats are known for the citrus, so it's not surprising that the brewers tout this Southampton Double White as "a stronger version of the classic Belgian white ale style." The Southampton Double White poured a hazy, light golden yellow color with a pen-width white head. The aroma had mostly wheat with strong citrus and spice notes. The body is smooth on the palate but crisp around the edges. There is a lot of wheat and a light sweetness up front. Bananas are apparent as well as citrus notes that lead to a very nice light finish with a light tart/sour aspect. The beer left a small amount of spotted lace on the glass. Overall, this is a great beer, a…

southamptonbieredegarde

By Contributing Columnist Donavan Hall On today’s show… I’m joined by my co-host Rich Thatcher.  We’ll be taking you to Spuyten Duyvil, a cool beer bar in Brooklyn.  Our featured beer of the day is Southampton’s Bière de Garde. I was hoping to get some coverage of last night beer dinner out at Southampton Publick House, but I didn’t get back from the dinner until after midnight.  Needless to say I had a good time.  I’ll tell you all about it soon. Southampton is putting on their beer dinner again, but this time in Huntington at Canterbury Ales.  This event will be on the 21st and you can find the details on the Long Island Beer Calendar or on my blog. If you really like beer dinners, mark this event on your calendar: May 23rd: Beer and Food Tasting WHERE: Deks American Restaurant in Rocky Point WHEN: Wednesday, May 23,…

sph2_2

I turned 32 last Thursday, so I took the day off to spend it with Nena and Jackson. We rarely make it out to the Hamptons, particularly once the ‘on season’ starts, so I thought it would be fun to head out to the Hamptons, enjoy the beautiful day and maybe have a tasty lunch somewhere. As we drove out, I didn’t have any particular restaurant in mind, but then we drove by Southampton Publick House, a place that I’ve wanted to try for a long time now. I’ve been a fan of their beer for quite a while and I’d heard some good things about the restaurant too. And, because it was my birthday, my loving wife (who avoids beer almost at all costs) suggested we go. We were there for lunch, and it was only our first time there, but at this point I’d still suggest that you…