Posts Tagged“stout”

Southampton Publick House 2013 Imperial Russian Stout

southampton-RIS

Comparing a vintage beer at different stages of its maturity isn’t something I get to do all the time, let alone a beer I have taken notes on. Recently, I’ve been cleaning up my wine and beer storage that I’ve wanted to check in on and, well, drinking them. I happen to pop this 2013 Imperial Russian Stout almost two years to the day that I last reviewed it here, on the New York Cork Report in 2013. Much about the beer has changed, yet much has stayed the same. The color and appearance of the stout hadn’t changed at…

Keegan Ales Mothers Milk Stout

keegan-ales-mothers-milk

Keegan Ales began brewing in an abandoned brewery in Kingston, NY around 2003. Since then, their beer lineup (especially the Mother’s Milk) has been a major staple in the Hudson Valley and New York beer scene. They now contract brew some of their beer in Stratford, CT. I like pouring this milk stout from the bottle with some vigor, which creates a nice frothy head and gets all the Oedipus complex out. The stout is mostly black, with a rich brown layer of foam. The nose is more grassy and dusty at first but leads to some sweeter aromas like chocolate…

Brooklyn Brewery Black Ops (2013)

2013-black-ops

According to Brooklyn Brewery’s website: [box_light]“Brooklyn Black Ops does not exist. However, if it did exist, it would be a robust stout originally concocted by the Brooklyn brewing team under cover of secrecy…Supposedly Black Ops was aged for four months in bourbon barrels, bottled flat, and re-fermented with champagne yeast.”  [/box_light] This stout is a limited production, vintage-labeled beer that is fervently sought after by Brooklyn Brewery enthusiasts. The Imperial Stout’s short supply and known aging potential creates a demand that evaporates Black Ops before it hits the shelves. I’ve had the opportunity to drink a 2008 vintage with four…

Southampton Publick House 2013 Russian Imperial Stout

southampton-russian-imperial-stout

Russian Imperial Stouts, like India Pale Ales, are named after the region they were originally shipped to, rather than where they were brewed.  The flavors and alcohol content of these styles (that we have grown to love as consumers) were born out of necessity.  High alcohol and hop content act as natural preservatives in beer.  So, as demand for foreign beer grew internationally, brewers resorted to adding additional hops and fermenting to higher alcohol — ensuring that their product could be shipped across longer distances.  Made to last, IPAs and Russian Imperial Stouts are still some of the most cellar-worthy…

Sixpoint Craft Ales Diesel

By Julia Burke, Beer Editor A good winter stout in a can. I dig it — great packaging and I have to admit I like the visual and tactile experience of popping a can of stout. Diesel looks scrumptious in the glass: an eponymous black and pours a nice one-finger head with beautiful lacing. Like many stouts, this beer needs to warm up to cellar temperature to before any of its wonderful flavors wake up. After a few minutes, rich malty aromas of toffee, coffee, and licorice emerge, making for a welcoming, sumptuous nose suggesting a winter ale; the palate,…

Keegan Ales Joe-Mama’s Milk Stout

By Kevin Burns, Beer Columnist A few weeks ago I reviewed Ithaca's TEN which won the 2008 gold medal of the F.X. Matt Memorial Cup as the best beer in New York State. Well this week we decided to review the 2009 winner of F.X. Cup, Keegan Ales' Joe-Mama's Milk Stout, their latest draft-only release. It's a coffee stout that blends coffee from the Muddy Cup Cafe with Keegan's wildly popular milk stout Mother's Milk. Joe-Mama's poured a pitch black color with a finger width tan head. The aroma has some light roasted malt, but is dominated by coffee beans.…