Posts Tagged“north fork”

David-Page-Shinn

David Page had his Newton-apple-falling-on-the-head moment in the basement bowels of a New York City restaurant. A chef by trade, he and his wife, Barbara Shinn, traveled east from California and washed into New York City in 1990.  By 1993, they had scrounged enough money together to open Home restaurant, a rustic, cozy place that celebrates traditional American cuisine.  Soon, their 60-seat restaurant (30 inside, 30 outside) was jammed to the gills with adoring fans feasting on Skillet Fried Chicken, Whole Grilled Trout and the like. Another restaurant would follow (Drovers Tap Room), a cookbook, prospects of more businesses in the neighborhood…it all became a blur for them as the long hours mounted up.  The New York City restaurant world can be grueling, with the long hours, the continual operational breakdowns (you ain’t seen nothing until you’ve seen plumbing from the late 1800s back up on you — trust me), and the…

roanoke-09-marco-tulio

I’ve said it before, but it is worthy of a reminder — in your excitement to taste Long Island’s 2010 reds, don’t skip over or dismiss the 2009s.  A dry, warm autumn rewarded those growers patient enough to let their fruit hang and soak up those last bits of sun. Roanoke Vineyards 2009 Marco Tulio ($24) is a blend of 66% cabernet franc and 34% cabernet sauvignon. Anyone who knows Long Island wine knows that Roanoke Vineyards makes some of the best cabernet franc in these parts, and that this wine is two-thirds franc is obvious from the first sniff. Black currants, blackberry and cherry fruit aromas are layered with grilled herbs, tobacco leaf, and a touch of smoke and sweet vanilla. Medium bodied and showing ripe, sweet fruit — currants, plum and cherry — there is a hint of vanilla and tobacco and a delicious spiciness (particularly on the second day…

By Lenn Thompson, Editor-in-Chief Even with the release of its 2007 wines, its second vintage, Onabay Vineyards, remains firmly under the radar of most local wine lovers. But they are a winery worth keeping an eye on for a number of reasons. Their vineyard is mature — 18 years old — and is managed by industry veteran Steve Mudd. The wines are made by another local vet, Bruce Schneider, a fellow cabernet franc fanatic and owner of Schneider Vineyards. Beyond Mudd and Schneider, Onabay is a family affair. The Anderson family owns the 180-acre farm that houses the vineyard and they involved in every other aspect of the winery. Francesca Anderson, a renowned botanical artist, created the drawings of herons that appear on the front labels. Her daughter, Mia C. Anderson, a published poet, wrote the poems that adorn the back labels. And her other daughter, Chiara Anderson Edmands, oversees…

By Lenn Thompson, Long Island Editor and Editor-in-Chief At Sherwood House Vineyards in Mattituck, NY, the focus is set squarely on Old World-style chardonnay and merlot. My distaste for regional comparisons aside, their chardonnay is extremely Burgundian and the merlots show restraint and elegance rather than jammy one dimension.  Owners Charles and Barbara Smithen purchased their 1860 farmhouse on Oregon Road in 1996 and planted their vines soon after, starting with 5 acres of chardonnay before planing just over 15 acres more with merlot and chardonnay in 1997. Nearly 7 acres of cabernet franc, cabernet sauvignon and petit verdot were added in 2000, meaning that almost 27 of their 38 acres are under vine.  The vineyard is managed by veteran vineyard manager and consultant Steve Mudd, and the wines are made by French-born Gilles Martin, who makes wines for a few other small producers. Sherwood House 2004 Blanc de Blanc ($37)…

Every time I drink a cabernet franc like this, I wonder how I had never heard of this beautiful, wonderful grape until I moved to Long Island almost a decade ago. To think, I could have been drinking cab franc back in grad school, wen was drinking super-fruity chardonnay and shiraz from Australia. Oh wait, maybe that's the problem, I was drinking those mass-produced, one-dimensional wines. I probably wouldn't have appreciated cab franc for all of it's non-fruity characteristics. This Clovis Point Winery 2005 Cabernet Franc ($25) is probably a wine I wouldn't have enjoyed back in my Black Opal and Blue Marlin days, but it's a wine that I impressed me in a blind tasting of local reds a few weeks ago. While not 100% cabernet franc, it's close, with only 2.5% cabernet sauvignon blended in. Medium ruby red in the glass, sure, there's fruit on the nose, mainly…

If you read about wine online much, you've no doubt heard of one of Long Island's newest wine producers, Bouke Wines. Pronounced like "bouquet," Bouke is the brainchild of Lisa Donneson and the wines are made by industry veteran Gilles Martin. Lisa has done a great job, better than most winery owners in New York, of engaging with the blogosphere to get her wines and brand out in front of bloggers and those who read blogs. Her wines are well priced (this red is the most expensive at $21) and I really appreciate her dedication to creating affordable, but still delicious wines. That kind of thinking is too rare in a region where prices keep escalating, sometimes in ridiculous ways. This wine, Bouke's 2007 Red ($21), is made from grapes grown in vineyards scattered throughout the North Fork. The specific blend is 35% merlot, 25% cabernet franc, 20% cabernet sauvignon,…

I definitely enjoyed this wine's 10% barrel-fermented sibling, but Croteaux Vineyards' 2007 Merlot "3 Clone" Rose ($18) was fermented entirely in oak and aged for 5 months in older oak barrels… and I just don't 'get' this wine. I like that Croteaux makes "rose on purpose," even if it seems a bit insane in such a tremendous vintage to use all of that beautiful merlot fruit for rose. And, it's kind of interesting that they do three different ones (I'll post my review of the third tomorrow), but this wine is just weird. Sometimes weird is good. Here, I'm not so sure. Your standard light pink in the glass, the nose offers few hints as to its merlot origins. There are hints of dried cherries here, but they are buried behind vanilla, toasted almonds and roasted marshmallows. Dry and medium bodied, the palate offers similar character — vanilla, marsmallow, caramel…

shinn_05estatemerlot

Many of the 2005 merlots that I’ve tasted have been big, plush and — frankly — not very true to Long Island’s unique terroir. These reds lean more towards California in style, at least in their youth, and aren’t very good values. Lovers of true Long Island wines should thank Shinn Estate Vineyards for staying true to the region with their Shinn Estate Vineyards 2005 Estate Merlot ($27). It’s a ripe, but surprisingly understated and agile red with blackberry, raspberry and plum on an expressive nose that is filled out with herbs, mocha, earth and vanilla. Similar flavors come through on the palate, with the addition of a minerally note on a medium-long finish. Medium-grip, but well-incorporated tannins provide nice structure and will give this wine some longevity, maybe 5-7 years. Today, it benefits greatly from an hour or two open, breathing. Grape(s): 81% merlot, 19% cabernet francProducer: Shinn Estate…

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By Lenn Thompson, Founder and Publisher The North Fork restaurant scene has improved greatly over the last several years. Restaurants like North Fork Table, Jedediah’s and Jamesport Manor have really upped the proverbial ante…but mainly for dinner. There is still a dire lack of quality, affordable lunch options for people visiting wine country. Even before Jadckson came along, Nena and I usually ended up at the Village Cheese Shop, located on Love Lane in the cute little village of Mattituck. We’d pick out a few cheeses, get a baguette and maybe some cured meat and olives, and take it to a winery to nibble on. But, just up the street is a relatively new lunch destination that gives us another good option: Love Lane Kitchen. When making those cheese-focused trips to Love Lane, we’d seen Love Lane Kitchen several times, but hadn’t stopped in. How was the food? Would it…

odw_06sauvblanc

Today’s review is going to be a quick one. Are you sick of over-the-top grassy sauvignon blancs from New Zealand? If so, let me suggest that you try Osprey’s Dominion Vineyards’ 2006 Sauvignon Blanc, a steal at $13. I’ve enjoyed many local sauvignons over the past couple years, but many are at or around $20, making them a little beyond the "summer sipper" price. Right out of the fridge, this one was a little tight and a bit neutral, but once it warmed just a bit, nice lemon, melon and grapefruit aromas appeared with just the most subtle hints of herbs and a salty-minerally note. The palate is fresh and clean with subtle flavors that won’t knock you over. Instead, the understated zesty citrus flavors with herb and mineral nuances entice the palate, inviting sip after sip. With terrific acid backbone and a crisp green apple finish, this wine is…