Posts Tagged“2014”

McCall Wines 2014 “Marjorie’s” Rose

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For several vintages now, McCall Wines’ rose has been a favorite in the Thompson household. It was also made with pinot noir. With the 2013 vintage, McCall added a second rose, adding a merlot-based wine to the lineup. In 2014, the winery’s entire rose production was merlot (I with a small addition of sauvignon blanc). “The pinot noir was a saignee. We wanted greater concentration in our red pinot noir without over-handling the wine. 2014 was such a stellar vintage that we didn’t need to do saignee. We would rather make the full amount of good-vintage pinot noir,” said Brewster McCall.…

Anthony Nappa Wines 2014 Anomaly White Pinot Noir

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I consider this wine a rose, though winemaker Anthony Nappa often refuses to call it one when we talk, preferring to call it a white pinot noir. Some years it’s whiter than others, but I consider it a rose regardless of color because of how it drinks — like a rose. Anthony Nappa Wines 2014 Anomaly ($20) is made with pinot noir grown both in the Finger Lakes and on Long Island because Nappa thinks that “a combination of New York’s two most prominent winegrowing regions complements each other and brings nice balance to this wine.” Unlike so many marketing messages in the wine world, I…

Harbes Vineyard 2014 Dry Rose

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I’ve been tasting a lot of Long Island rose over the past few weeks — both because it’s the season and because I was researching a story that will be published in the Long Island Wine Press next month. Like any category, Long Island rose is always a mixed bag. There are wines that you know will always be good, regardless of vintage. There are wines you always want to be good, but underwhelm. And then there are the wines that surprise you — either in a good or bad way. Harbes Vineyard 2014 Dry Rose ($18) was a pleasant surprise…

Wolffer Estate 2014 “Summer in a Bottle” Rose

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Much like the season that inspired its name, Wolffer Estate Vineyard‘s “Summer in a Bottle” Rose has been hot since its debut last spring. The initial 1,500 or so cases were gone seemingly before summer had hit its stride. Winemaker Roman Roth made nearly four times as much in 2014 (5,700 cases) so it should be around at least a bit longer into the season, which is a very good thing. Wolffer Estate Vineyards 2014 “Summer in a Bottle” Rose ($24) shows aromas of strawberries and mixed melons — orange and green. It’s not as brightly aromatic as its sister rose, but it’s not muted either.…

Wolffer Estate 2014 Rose

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There are so many styles of rose these days — both here on Long Island and in the wine world at large. New and different renditions pop up every year but when many people think about Long Island rose, they think about Wolffer Estate Vineyard, where winemaker Roman Roth crafts what is know to many as “the wine of the Hamptons season.” Tasting Wolffer Estate Vineyard 2014 Rose ($18) recently, I was reminded why it’s such a classic wine and nearly ubiquitous on the South Fork every summer. Made with 56% merlot, 18% chardonnay, 16% cabernet franc, 5% pinot noir, 4% riesling…

Dr. Konstantin Frank 2014 Gruner Veltliner

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I’ve been lucky when it comes to Gruner Veltliner, one of the great grapes of Austria. Through friends who have worked for various importers over the years, I’ve been introduced to some incredible renditions — expressive wines of intensity, balance and flat-out deliciousness. With that as context, I’ve been a bit let down by most New York Gruner. I used to chalk it up to young vines, poor picking decisions and winemakers getting their footing with it in the cellar. I still think that’s true in some cases, but I’ve also been guilty of not allowing the grapes to express what…

Raphael 2014 Sauvignon Blanc

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Made without even a splinter of oak, Raphael 2014 Sauvignon Blanc ($20), is a brisk, somewhat lean rendition of North Fork sauvignon blanc. Dominant aromas and flavors of citrus blossom, stony talc and straw are supported by light lemon, lemon verbena and gooseberry qualities. Juicy, citrusy acid keeps the palate crunchy and accentuates the minerally, stony notes. Bottled only a month ago, I plan to re-taste this wine in a month or so and will update this note if needed. Producer: Raphael AVA: North Fork of Long Island Varieties: 97% Sauvignon Blanc, 3% Semillon pH: 3.18 TA: 8.4 g/L Barrel Program: None;…

Keuka Lake Vineyards 2014 Leon Millot Nouveau

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Given the popularity of Beaujolais Nouveau every fall, it’s long surprised me how few New York wineries (or American wineries for that matter) have embraced the concept. I mean, most Beaujolais Nouveau is terrible. I’m sure New York wineries can do better. Enter Keuka Lake Vineyards 2014 Leon Millot Nouveau ($18). Keuka Lake Vineyards has a bit of a cult following for it’s non-nouveau Leon Millot — an inky dark, chewy red unlike many from the Finger Lakes. On the other hand, this nouveau is soft and fruity, which red cherry note and just a little little cassis. There is a…

Macari Vineyards 2014 “Early Wine” Chardonnay

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The release of very few Long Island wines can match the buzz generated when Macari Vineyards releases their “Early Wine” Chardonnay each fall, right after harvest winds down. It’s always the first wine from the new vintage to hit store shelves, serving as a harbiger for Thanksgiving as well as the winter holidays. You can think of it as Long Island’s Beaujolais Nouveau — except it’s delicious. Originally inspired by the jungwein (young wine) of Macari’s consulting winemaker Helmut Gangl’s homeland, Austria — where they are often served in heuriger shortly after harvest — the grapes for this wine wine were picked on September 8.…

Winter Vine Damage Not Widespread on Long Island — But it’s Out There

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This past winter was a rough one across much of the northeast, with lots of snow and some of the coldest temperatures in recent years. As my colleague Evan Dawson wrote last month, those temperatures will have a not-insignificant impact on the Finger Lakes wine industry. On Long Island, the damage wasn’t nearly as severe or widespread, but with bud break’s arrival, Long Island growers can now better assess what damage was sustained, if any. Elevation matters, even here where many Long Island are seemingly flat. Little rises and dips matter because the coldest air pools in those low areas…